Armenian Wedding Traditions: Welcoming the Bride and Groom

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We love sharing different Armenian Wedding Traditions on our blog. This week we are excited to share some traditions that couples can choose to incorporate as part of welcoming the bride and groom. According to old Armenian tradition, after the wedding ceremony at the church, the couple and their guests would celebrate at the groom’s house. Upon their arrival, a few traditions would take place with Lavash, honey, plates and more! 

Armenian Wedding Traditions

Photo by Armen Asadorian Photography

As the bride and groom entered the house, they would break a plate which brought good luck. The couple were to be greeted by the groom’s mother who offered them Lavash—a type of Armenian bread—and honey. Eating a spoon of honey symbolized happiness for the newlyweds. They wore the lavash on their shoulders for good luck and to keep away evil spirits. At this time, the guests showered them with sweets, nuts and coins for a warm welcome and gave the couple gifts, money and jewels. The celebration then continued with amazing foods, drinks, and traditional Armenian music and dancing until late evening.

Although the traditions have been adjusted for modern times, many couples still continue to break a plate as they enter the banquet hall for their reception.

Armenian wedding tradition: breaking plate

Another example is as the bride and groom leave the bride’s house to go to the ceremony, guests throw sweets, nuts and coins. Also, instead of coins, many family members shower the bride and groom with money at the morning celebration or at the reception.

Armenian Wedding Tradition: Throwing Money

Armenian Wedding Tradition: Throwing money

Photos by Vic Studios

Did you incorporate any of these traditions into your wedding? We’d love to hear stories of your Armenian wedding. And if you have other Armenian Wedding Traditions you'd like us to feature on our blog, contact us! We always love to hear from our users.

 

Tags: armenian , tradition

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